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Messaging apps are shaping the mobile web’s future with a strategy straight from the ’90s

favicon Quartz
1 mentions2 days ago
They were all competitors to Yahoo, back when finding interesting things online meant going to a web portal (or typing in a web address you had committed to memory). Portals were appropriately named: they really were the gateway to the world wide web. But the gateway was narrow.

Algorithms Are Replacing Unions As The Champions of Workers

favicon TechCrunch
1 mentions2 days ago
Quality of life is perhaps the single largest factor underpinning human happiness, and that quality is largely determined by one’s job. It should be no wonder then that so many activists and politicians have made improving work a key element of their advocacy for generations. The history of ...

5 basic skills of power, and how you can learn to wield them

favicon ideas.ted.com
5 mentions3 days ago
Eric Liu is on a mission to make civics “as sexy as it was during the American Revolution or the Civil Rights Movement.” As he describes in today’s TED Talk (watch: Why ordinary people need to understand power), we are at a moment of crisis in the United ...

Could a DNA Test Have Predicted the Suicide of Robin Williams?

favicon MIT Technology Review
2 mentions7 days ago
About 39,000 people kill themselves in the U.S. each year. It is the 10th most common cause of death. When someone commits suicide, the reaction is often the same. It’s disbelief, mixed with a recognition that the signs were all there. Depression. Maybe talk of ending one’s life.

Implanted neuronal stem cells generate neurons and synapses, becoming a functioning part of mouse brain

favicon KurzweilAI
3 mentions6 days ago
Part of a brain slice showing a functioning transplanted induced neural stem cell (green) fully integrated in the neuronal network of the brain (blue) (credit: LCSB) Scientists at the Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LCSB) of the University of Luxembourg have grafted induced neuronal stem cells (iNSC) into ...

3D sketching system ‘revolutionizes’ design interaction and collaboration

favicon KurzweilAI
3 mentions1 week ago
University of Montreal researchers present their Hyve-3D system at the SIGGRAPH 2014 conference this week (credit: University of Montreal) University of Montreal researchers have developed a collaborative 3D sketching system called Hyve-3D (Hybrid Virtual Environment 3D), which they presented at the SIGGRAPH 2014 conference in Vancouver this week.

Drones Can Now Perch on Power Lines to Recharge

favicon PSFK
3 mentions1 week ago
By Nestor Bailly, PSFKon August 12, 2014 inTechnologyMIT researchers have created flying drones that can recharge on power lines rather than returning to base when they run out of batteries You glance up at high-tension power lines while driving along the highway. You spot ominous black shapes perched ...

NASA Funds Robotic Tumbling Cubes for Space Exploration

favicon IEEE Spectrum
7 mentions1 week ago
NASA wants to go to an asteroid. Great! And once NASA gets there, then what? Exploration, of course, since that's what NASA does. But the microgravity (or minigravity?) environment is a challenging one to get around in. There's likely not enough gravity to use wheels or treads to ...

Do We Look Fat in These Suburbs?

favicon The Atlantic
2 mentions6 days ago
Just seeing someone wearing a Fitbit makes me nervous. I'm told I have a tendency to become “obsessive.” A count of steps or calories burned would be a destructive competition, just one more thing haunting quiet moments telling me I could be working harder, doing more. Pedometers are ...

Use a Remote Control Robot to Roam a Closed Museum Right Now

favicon Gizmodo
3 mentions1 week ago
Remember way back in February when we reported that this summer you'd be able to remotely control robots to explore the Tate Britain After DarkWell—it's (finally) this summer, and now's your chance! Starting this very minute, you can check out the live footage of four bots gone wild—and ...

Rooms with Moods: Built-In Emotional Awareness Is Changing the Home and Beyond

favicon PSFK
2 mentions1 week ago
Devices that can understand and anticipate what we are feeling are helping us interact and communicate more effectively with each other, our surroundings and ourselves.Our emotions are subject to the ebbs and flow of daily life. Even the subtlest differences in our environments can have a visceral effect ...

Building Mind-Controlled Gadgets Just Got Easier

favicon IEEE Spectrum
5 mentions1 week ago
The guys who decided to make a mind-reading tool for the masses are not neuroscientists. In fact, they’re artists who met at Parsons the New School for Design, in New York City. In this day and age, you don’t have to be a neuroscientist to muck around with ...

Best Quotes and Sayings about Books

favicon Skip Prichard - Leadership Insights
1 mentions1 week ago
It is no secret that I love books.Though I prefer the printed book, I also have electronic collections on every advice imaginable.From speaking about the future of books or how books make a better life to visiting bookstores and libraries around the globe, I share this passion with ...

Bert Vogelstein’s Liquid Biopsy Blood Test for DNA Could Stop Cancer

favicon MIT Technology Review
4 mentions1 week ago
He watched his brother die from a cancer that no drug could cure. Now one of the world’s most renowned cancer researchers says it’s time for Plan B. Vogelstein is among the most highly cited scientists in the world. He was described, in the 1980s, as having broken ...

Researchers Create a No-Power Internet of Things

favicon Big Think
2 mentions1 week ago
We live in a time of information abundance, which far too many of us see as information overload. With the sum total of human knowledge, past and present, at our fingertips, we’re faced with a crisis of attention: which ideas should we engage with, and why? Big Think ...

Researchers Teach Smartphone Camera to Act as Depth Sensor

favicon MIT Technology Review
1 mentions1 week ago
Microsoft researchers say simple hardware changes and machine learning techniques let a regular smartphone camera act as a depth sensor. On camera: With a few hardware changes, such as a ring of near-infrared LEDs, a Microsoft LifeCam is adapted to work as a depth camera. Just about everybody ...

How robots have already taken over our world

favicon Sploid
2 mentions7 days ago
If you think it's just a joke that robots are going to replace humans, it's not. It's going to happen. In fact, CGP Grey explains in 'Humans Need Not Apply' how it's already happening around us right now. You might not notice it but you will after you ...

PARC Researchers’ Invention Could Revolutionize Electronics

favicon MIT Technology Review
5 mentions1 week ago
In the same research lab where the ethernet, laser printer, and graphical user interface were born, engineers are forging an entirely new way to assemble electronic devices—a technique that could be faster, cheaper, and more versatile.Typically, chips are made in bulk on semiconductor wafers and then cut into ...

Brain regeneration: Crayfish turn blood into neurons

favicon New Scientist
3 mentions1 week ago
Think crayfish and you probably think supper, perhaps with mayo on the side. You probably don't think of their brains. Admittedly, crayfish aren't known for their grey matter, but that might be about to change: they can grow new brain cells from blood. Humans can make new neurons,

Can women make the world more peaceful?

favicon the Guardian
1 mentions1 week ago
Do women hold the key to a peaceful society? Much is known about the victimisation of women through rape, trafficking, and early marriages, but much is yet to be discovered about how women can be empowered in conflict settings to bridge the gap towards peace. I recently conducted ...

Tiny Ants Might Be Helping Cool Earth's Climate

favicon Mashable
1 mentions2 weeks ago
Ants may be some of Earth's most powerful biological climate brokers, a provocative new study claims. The average ant lives and dies in less than a year, but a long-term experiment tracking the insects' effects on soil suggests they cooled Earth's climate as their numbers grew. "Ants are ...

The most productive people work for 52 minutes at...

favicon Explore
2 mentions2 weeks ago
The most productive people work for 52 minutes at a time, then break for 17 minutes before getting back to it. The employees with the highest productivity ratings, in fact, don’t even work eight-hour days. Turns out, the secret to retaining the highest level of productivity over the ...

The 10 Greatest Documentaries of All Time According to 340 Filmmakers and Critics

favicon Open Culture
2 mentions2 weeks ago
Earlier this year we featured the aesthetically radical 1929 documentary A Man with a Movie Camera. In it, director Dziga Vertov and his editor-wife Elizaveta Svilova, as Jonathan Crow put it, gleefully use “jump cuts, superimpositions, split screens and every other trick in a filmmaker’s arsenal” to craft ...

50 million years of incredible shrinking theropod dinosaurs

favicon Tetrapod Zoology, Scientific American Blog Network
2 mentions3 weeks ago
Theropod dinosaurs encompass a huge range of body sizes. This illustration shows a Broad-billed Hummingbird (Cynanthus latirostris) in front of a tooth of the giant allosauroid Carcharodontosaurus. Images courtesy of Terry Sohl and Christophe Hendrickx. Some time round about 165 million years ago, the group of small, feathered ...

Why we should believe the dreamers — and not the experts

favicon Washington Post
3 mentions3 weeks ago
History is littered with the failed predictions of experts. Yet governments hire high-paid consultants to advise on policy; businesses use them to vet research and development projects; and venture capitalists have them make investment decisions. Experts excel in looking backwards, protecting their turf, and saying what their clients ...

The new low-carbon diet: eat well without gobbling up resources

favicon the Guardian
1 mentions3 weeks ago
Determining a food’s carbon cost is a difficult proposition. These recipes, from some of the world’s top restaurants, highlight the difficulties – and pleasures – of eating sustainably The global food system is bracing for big changes. Around the world, resources are straining to deal with a host ...

Where do ideas come from?

favicon TED.com
2 mentions3 weeks ago
If you want to get even more from TED, like the ability to save talks to watch later, sign up for a TED account now. TED.com translations are made possible by volunteer translators. Learn more about the Open Translation Project.

Upgrade Your Brain: Liquid Hard Drive Implants Could Increase Intellect

favicon International Business Times UK
2 mentions3 weeks ago
Storing photos, documents and other files in brain-implantable liquid could one day be a reality after researchers discovered a new method of storing data in microscopic particles suspended in a solution. Scientists at the University of Michigan realised that digital information could be stored on colloidal clusters after ...

Google's New Moonshot Project: the Human Body

favicon WSJ
5 mentions4 weeks ago
Google Inc. has embarked on what may be its most ambitious and difficult science project ever: a quest inside the human body.Called Baseline Study, the project will collect anonymous genetic and molecular information from 175 people—and later thousands more—to create what the company hopes will be the fullest ...

10 Surprising things you didn’t know about African leaders

favicon ONE
2 mentions4 weeks ago
In August, dozens of African leaders are coming to Washington, D.C., to meet President Obama and US officials for the first-ever US-African Leaders Summit. Here are 10 surprising facts you may not know about some of these heads of state! While Jacob Zuma was imprisoned for conspiring to ...

Lessons from a school that scrapped a longer student day and made time for teachers

favicon The Hechinger Report
15 mentions4 weeks ago
NEW HAVEN, Conn. –– Talizha Jones returned from summer vacation after fourth grade to an unwelcome surprise at school: Students would have to stay in class until 4:15 p.m. four days a week. “I was very upset,” the now-14-year-old recalled. “I was asking my grandma if I could ...

From Outliers To A Growing Force: What Do Women Entrepreneurs In The Middle East Need To Thrive?

favicon Forbes
2 mentions4 weeks ago
For many years in the Middle East, the harsh weather, the oil wealth, male dominance of the public space, as well as a traditional patriarchal society made it difficult—or unnecessary—for women to enter the business world. But some were able to break through and thrive in that sector.

The $1 Paper Microscope That Could Change the World

favicon Businessweek.com
3 mentions4 weeks ago
When diagnosing people in the developing world, health workers often go into the field lugging bulky, fragile, and expensive microscopes. “We ship research equipment and hope it’ll survive,” says Manu Prakash, a biophysicist. While traveling in Thailand, the scientist dreamt up a lightweight, low-cost alternative: a pocket-sized paper ...

When Technologies Combine, Amazing Innovation Happens

favicon Co.Exist
6 mentions4 weeks ago
Innovation occurs both within fields, and in combinations of fields. It's perhaps the latter that ends up being most groundbreaking. When people of disparate expertise, mindset and ideas work together, new possibilities pop up.In a new report, the Institute for the Future argues that "technological change is increasingly ...

4 Essential Elements of Storytelling

favicon The Chronicle of Philanthropy
2 mentions4 weeks ago
I’m involved in an economic-development project between a nonprofit and a foundation. We’re pretty good at telling stories, but we’re looking to be more strategic and support the broader field. Any advice on how we should approach this?Good stories have a certain magic to them, don’t they? But ...

A Brief History of How Bees Sexed Up Earth and Gave Flowers Their Colors

favicon Brain Pickings
14 mentions1 month ago
The great E.O. Wilson is credited with having once said, “If all mankind were to disappear, the world would regenerate back to the rich state of equilibrium that existed ten thousand years ago. If insects were to vanish, the environment would collapse into chaos.” But while the one ...

How the Maker Movement Is Moving into Classrooms

favicon Edutopia
2 mentions4 weeks ago
Strategies from K-12 schools, districts, and programs that are dramatically improving the learning process. We share evidence- and practitioner-based learning strategies that empower you to improve K-12 education. The Maker movement is a unique combination of artistry, circuitry, and old-fashioned craftsmanship. Certainly, learning by doing or "making" has ...

We’re heading into a jobless future, no matter what the government does

favicon Washington Post
2 mentions4 weeks ago
In an op-ed in The Wall Street Journal, former Treasury Secretary Lawrence Summers revived a debate I’d had with futurist Ray Kurzweil in 2012 about the jobless future.He echoed the words of Peter Diamandis, who says that we are moving from a history of scarcity to an era ...

Sixth-Grader's Science Project Catches Ecologists' Attention

favicon NPR.org
1 mentions4 weeks ago
Lauren Arrington's sixth-grade research project is cited in a science journal. Courtesy of Lauren Arrington hide caption (July 24, 2014: See the editor's note at the bottom of this page for an explanation of the story's new headline.) When 12-year-old Lauren Arrington heard about her sixth-grade science project,

Radio frequency ID tags on honey bees reveal hive dynamics

favicon phys.org
2 mentions4 weeks ago
Scientists attached radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags to hundreds of individual honey bees and tracked them for several weeks. The effort yielded two discoveries: Some foraging bees are much busier than others; and if those busy bees disappear, others will take their place.Tagging the bees revealed that about 20 ...

Future Phone Displays Could Take Your Temperature, Analyze DNA

favicon Mashable
1 mentions1 month ago
Researchers from Polytechnique Montreal and Gorilla Glass manufacturer Corning are working together to develop display sensors that read your spit.The sensors would be embedded within the smartphone's display and allow users to take their temperature, assess blood levels (if diabetic) and in theory, work alongside platforms such as ...

How Data Will Transform Science

favicon Forbes
4 mentions4 weeks ago
In the late 17th century a middle-aged draper named Antonie van Leeuwenhoek became interested in the magnifying glasses he used to inspect fabric.He started experimenting with making his own, eventually creating one of the world’s first microscopes.His work caught the attention of the Royal Society in London, which ...

Flexible Printed Batteries May Soon Power Wearable Tech

favicon Mashable
1 mentions4 weeks ago
A California startup is developing flexible, rechargeable batteries that can be printed cheaply on commonly used industrial screen printers. Imprint EnergyImprint Energy, of Alameda, California, has been testing its ultra-thin zinc-polymer batteries in wrist-worn devices and hopes to sell them to manufacturers of wearable electronics, medical devices, smart ...

3ders.org - US Army investigating ways to produce 3D printed food for soldiers

favicon 3D Printer News & 3D Printing News
3 mentions4 weeks ago
US Army investigating ways to produce 3D printed food for soldiersU.S. Army researchers are investigating ways to use 3D printing to produce food for soldiers. Their mission is to advance novel food technologies to make them suitable for military field feeding needs, according to Lauren Oleksyk of Natick ...

Top 10 Programming Languages

favicon IEEE Spectrum
3 mentions1 month ago
Working with computational journalist Nick Diakopoulos, IEEE Spectrum has weighted and combined 12 metrics from 10 sources (including IEEE Xplore, Google, and GitHub) to rank the most popular programming languages. If you don’t agree with our weighting, want to see more languages, or are interested in what’s dominant ...

Light Could Restore Lost Hearing

favicon Scientific American
2 mentions1 month ago
An orchestra crescendos, and deaf audience members hear every note, thanks to cochlear implants that translate the complex sounds into a rainbow of optical light. That is the vision of a team of scientists in Germany, Japan, South Korea and Singapore, who believe a device that uses optics ...

How Einstein Thought: Why “Combinatory Play” Is the Secret of Genius

favicon Brain Pickings
5 mentions1 month ago
For as long as I can remember — and certainly long before I had the term for it — I’ve believed that creativity is combinatorial: Alive and awake to the world, we amass a collection of cross-disciplinary building blocks — knowledge, memories, bits of information, sparks of inspiration,

Forget the Wisdom of Crowds; Neurobiologists Reveal the Wisdom of the Confident

favicon MIT Technology Review
3 mentions1 month ago
The wisdom of crowds breaks down when people are biased. Now researchers have discovered a simple method of removing this bias–just listen to the most confident. Way back in 1906, the English polymath Francis Galton visited a country fair in which 800 people took part in a contest ...

Gorgeous Slow-Mo of the Machine-Like Beauty of Honeybees in Flight

favicon Gizmodo
3 mentions1 month ago
Photographer Michael Sutton spent hours getting up close and personal with a hive of honey bees at Hillside Apiaries in New Hampshire. He got stung three times. But he also got this gorgeous slo-mo footage of honey bees in flight. I bet you'll never look at a bee ...

Wearable Tech’s New Frontier: Charting Hospital Patients’ Progress

favicon Businessweek.com
2 mentions1 month ago
It started with headaches. Melissa Carleton originally wrote them off as an annoyance, a normal irritation of her pregnancy, then in its third month. But after the headaches grew in intensity, the doctors confirmed the worst: Lande had a fist-size brain tumor, and just five days after her ...
 

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